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Computer Repair Services Orange County California (714)975-3656

Computer Repair, Computer Service, Computer Support, Computer Consultant, Tech Support, IT Service, IT Support, PC Repair, Network Repair, Laptop Repair, Data Recovery, Disaster Recovery, IT Repair, IT Consultant, PC Service, PC Support, Network Service, Network Support, Network Consultant, Laptop Service, IT Management, Virus Removal, Spyware Removal, Wireless Networks, Orange County, California, Web Design, SEO

Horseshoes made for champions – OCRegister

Horseshoes made for champions

 Edwin Kinney, owner of Thoro'bred Inc. of Anaheim, stands with rolled aluminum bars that will soon be cut and forged into specialized horseshoes.

Edwin Kinney, owner of Thoro’bred Inc. of Anaheim, stands with rolled aluminum bars that will soon be cut and forged into specialized horseshoes.

PAUL RODRIGUEZ , STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Thoro’Bred

Address: 5020 E. La Palma Ave. in Anaheim

Contact: 714-779-1582

Website: Thorobredinc.com

What is a farrier?

While shoes certainly don’t make the horse, a poorly shod thoroughbred will suffer on the race course.

Race track farriers are responsible for installing horseshoes and making adjustments to optimize the horse’s gait. It’s a highly specialized trade that takes years to master.

Even after 34 years of shoeing horses in Idaho and locally at the Los Alamitos Race Course, Bob Rynearson said he still doesn’t feel like he’s mastered the craft.

While farriers no longer have to forge their own shoes, they must adjust each racing plate based on the horse’s gait. The running form of a horse can be adjusted slightly by using corrective shoes.

Farriers hammer the shoes into hooves with care, paying special attention to nail placement.

Horseshoe nails are driven into the walls of the hoof, a protective, fingernail-like substance which surrounds the sole. Rynearson said the process is painless if the horseshoes are installed correctly.

The horseshoe nails are driven through the wall of the hoof at an angle. After penetrating the exterior of the hoof, the farrier bends the horseshoe nail upward around the exterior of the hoof wall. This secures the horseshoe. The farrier then files the shoe flush with the hoof wall.

Edwin Kinney is the quiet winner of the Kentucky Derby.

The owner of Thoro’Bred in Anaheim has had a stake in the race for decades. But his bets aren’t tied up in fickle odds. They’re nailed tightly into the hooves of rose-gilded champions.

“We’ve been fortunate enough over the years to have our shoes on the legends of racing, including Secretariat, John Henry, Sunday Silence and probably the majority of Kentucky Derby winners in the past 20 years,” Kinney said.

Even local darling California Chrome was sporting Thoro’Bred kicks as he won the Derby and the Preakness Stakes.

The Anaheim company forges thousands of horseshoes for both racing and recreational horses at its La Palma Avenue factory.

More than 500 shoe varieties are stamped from tons of aircraft-grade aluminum. The shoes are shipped to distributors and race tracks around the world.

Thoro’Bred racing plates are a local favorite. About 90percent of the quarter and thoroughbred horses at Los Alamitos Race Course run with the company’s shoes, farrier Bob Rynearson said.

Rynearson works as a standby shoer for the racecourse, making last minute adjustments to the plates before the horses step into the starting gates. He adjusts and hammers the pre-made shoes into hooves on the fly, sometimes with only a few minutes to spare before the starting gun.

Nail hole placement, weight and material are critical to the highly specialized farrier craft, Rynearson said about the horseshoe options available on the market.

In return, Kinney said he considers the trade an art form and relies heavily on farrier feedback to optimize Thoro’Bred’s designs.

The horseshoe manufacturing industry is a small world, Rynearson said. Only a handful of rival brands compete with Thoro’Bred for the attention of farriers.

“It’s not like computers or cell phones or cars,” Rynearson said. “Few people have race cars and fewer people have a race horse.”

Even Kinney isn’t a horseman. While he grew up around the animals, his interest was in motorized steeds.

“(My father) had horses, and my sister had horses,” Kinney said. “I had dirt bikes.”

Edwin Kinney’s father, Bruce, started Thoro’Bred in South Los Angeles in 1949. At the time, widespread manufacturing of horseshoes was largely nonexistent, Kinney said. Most farriers doubled as blacksmiths, shoeing horses in the morning and forging shoes in the afternoon.


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Man facing new sex charges less than a year after previous arrest – The Daily Progress

Less than a month after remaining free on bond on charges of abduction and rape, a registered sex offender is behind bars again, facing new charges in another sex crime.

Authorities arrested Nathaniel Hollis Lamb, 30, in Albemarle County on charges of abduction, forcible sodomy and object sexual penetration. The Albemarle man is being held in the Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail, according to county police.

A West Virginia woman testified in July in Charlottesville General District Court that she and Lamb agreed to meet after she posted a Craigslist ad offering exotic dances and housecleaning. The two met in August 2013 near Angus Road and Emmet Street, where he tied her up, blindfolded her then drove her to an unknown location and raped her twice in his truck over the course of several hours, she testified. Lamb said the sex was consensual.

Lamb was denied bond at an initial hearing on these charges in September 2013. He was released months later due to complications in returning an “indispensable witness” to Charlottesville after she was held on a charge in her home state, said city Commonwealth’s Attorney David Chapman.

“Under those circumstances, we had to let him be released,” Chapman said. “Otherwise we would have had to drop the charges altogether.”

On Aug. 7, two weeks after July hearing, Lamb was granted bond in Charlottesville Circuit Court after a grand jury indicted him in the 2013 abduction and rape case, according to online court records.

A March trial date has been set in the case.

In 2004, Lamb pleaded guilty to using a computer to solicit a minor. He received a five-year suspended sentence and was added to the state sex offender registry.

A year later, he was charged with felony object sexual penetration and misdemeanor contributing to the delinquency of a minor. Lamb pleaded guilty to the misdemeanor charge and prosecutors dropped the felony case, according to court records.

In 2010, Lamb was arrested twice by county police, once for failing to register as a sex offender and a second time for assault and battery. Lamb received a 90 day sentence for failing to register, and a six month sentence for the assault charge, but all of his time was suspended, according to court records.

Albemarle police and Lamb’s lawyer J.P. “Jake” Joyce could not be reached Monday evening for comment on Lamb.


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Who’s rich, who’s poor? Lawmakers show us their money – OCRegister

Who’s rich, who’s poor? Lawmakers show us their money

rep-estimated-richest-iss

Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Vista, tops a list of richest congressional leaders with an estimated net worth of $357.25 million.
FILE PHOTO: THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON – California’s congressional representatives are among the richest and – surprise – among the poorest of Congress’ lawmakers, according to federally required financial disclosure reports.

Republican Rep. Darrell Issa of Vista took the top spot as the richest member for the second year in a row with $357.25 million in estimated net worth. He did it, in part, with seven high-yield bonds listed as being worth more than $50 million.

Along with ranking, the Roll Call report revealed lawmakers’ investments. Some highlights:

• Freshman Rep. Scott Peters, D-La Jolla, had investment success from the millions he earned in the 1990s as an environmental attorney. His wife, Lynn Gorguze, holds at least $14 million in assets, Roll Call reported. Peters landed at No. 8.

• Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s husband, Richard Blum, has various business holdings, including “in Current Media, the company headed by former Vice President Al Gore that was sold to Al Jazeera,” Roll Call reported. She came in at No. 9.

• Rep. Gary Miller, R-Rancho Cucamonga, has a property portfolio that nearly doubled. He is No. 13 with $32.97 million.

• Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-San Francisco, benefited from her husband’s investment decisions, with a minimum net worth of $29.1 million. For example, Paul Pelosi’s investment in broadcast and cable TV company Comcast doubled to $500,000 in 2013 from 2012. The couple’s joint investments include a vineyard worth at least $5 million. They landed at No. 14 berth on the Top 50 list.

• Rep. John Campbell, R-Irvine, who made his first fortune in managing and owning car dealerships, is also doing well with real estate, according to Roll Call. He was No. 40, with $10.21 million.

The No. 1 “poorest” member of Congress was Rep. David Valadao, R-Hanford, who has a net worth that is “a mystery” and is “a prime example of how imprecise congressional financial disclosure requirements are,” said Roll Call, of the report released Sunday night. Valadao has a dairy farm and five separate million-dollar-plus liabilities related to the farm.

Also in the bottom list were Reps. Dana Rohrabacher, R-Costa Mesa, and Buck McKeon, R-Santa Clarita, both with big mortgages to thank for upside-down finances. Rohrabacher, however, gets an asterisk because disclosure rules require his mortgage be counted even though he paid it off last year.

All told, the Top 50 congressional wallets grew fatter in 2013 compared with 2012, including the six from California. “It took a minimum reported net worth of at least $7.4 million just to crack the exclusive 50 richest club, up 10 percent from $6.7 million when we did the project one year ago,” Roll Call reported. Many benefited from a stock market that posted its largest gains since the mid-1990s.

Of course, sharing personal money data isn’t lawmakers’ favorite thing.

“It’s a media obsession based on inexact tables,” said Issa’s spokesman, Frederick Hill. “Interpretations of who is the wealthiest, a ranking, is not what the forms are intended for. The public interest is in seeing where it is invested” for possible conflicts of interest, he said, “not seeing the exact value of particular investments.”

A fuller view of Issa’s wealth would show him rising from working family roots and his early entrepreneurial success building a car alarm company, long before he was elected to Congress in 2000, Hill said.

Still, some call for more disclosure. “I would put disclosure in quotes,” said Kathy Kiely, managing editor of the Sunlight Foundation, whose goal is to increase transparency and accountability in Congress and government. There are “very broad categories of value and a number of things are exempt. I don’t think it inspires in constituents that we have a very accurate accounting of the financial interests of lawmakers.”

Kiely added: “That’s just part of the contract, that’s part of the deal and lawmakers should be more forthcoming than the current law requires,” she said.

Voters, though, aren’t necessarily repelled by wealth in Congress, said Jack Pitney, political science professor at Claremont McKenna College. Voters may see wealth as a sign of accomplishment and experience. John F. Kennedy is modern history’s example of the combination of great wealth and leadership – and his wealth was inherited.

More likely, Pitney said, is that a rich politician will get into trouble with how he or she relates to voters of all incomes – as presidential candidate Mitt Romney did with his “47 percent” statement.

The rankings’ financial picture, Roll Call said, is not precise because of reporting rules. For instance, home mortgages are counted as a liability while the remaining value of a home isn’t counted.

David Hood of the Washington Bureau contributed to this report.

Contact the writer: ctaylor@ocregister.com


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Pac-12 punishes Haden, Sarkisian for ‘inappropriate’ actions on sideline – OCRegister

Pac-12 punishes Haden, Sarkisian for ‘inappropriate’ actions on sideline

 USC Coach Steve Sarkisian was reprimanded by the Pac-12 Conference Monday for his sideline conduct during Saturday's game at Stanford. Trojans Athletic Director Pat Haden was fined $25,000 for coming to the sideline during the game to engage the game officials in a discussion about USC penalties.

USC Coach Steve Sarkisian was reprimanded by the Pac-12 Conference Monday for his sideline conduct during Saturday’s game at Stanford. Trojans Athletic Director Pat Haden was fined $25,000 for coming to the sideline during the game to engage the game officials in a discussion about USC penalties.

TONY AVELAR , THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

USC can’t seem to stay out of the news ticker.

On the heels of a signature victory at Stanford on Saturday, all anyone wanted to talk about was Athletic Director Pat Haden engaging the game officials at the behest of Coach Steve Sarkisian.

That remained the case Monday, when the Pac-12 Conference punished Haden and Sarkisian for their behavior on the sideline.

The league reprimanded Haden and fined him $25,000. It also reprimanded Sarkisian.

“The conduct by USC athletics director Pat Haden was inappropriate,” Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott said in a statement. “Such actions by an administrator in (an) attempt to influence the officiating, and ultimately the outcome of a contest, will not be tolerated.

“The conduct by both Sarkisian and Haden (was) in clear violation of our conference’s Standards of Conduct policy. We appreciate the public apology and recognition of the errors in judgment, as well as Pat Haden’s self-imposed two-game sideline ban. We took this into consideration as we determined the discipline.

“Nonetheless, the actions fell short of our expectation of our head coaches and athletics directors as role models for our student-athletes and important leaders of our institutions.”

Sarkisian ripped into the officials during the third quarter, drawing an unsportsmanlike-conduct penalty. He then requested that Haden come to the field to intervene. Haden animatedly talked to the refs, then conducted an interview about it with ABC.

Sarkisian said Sunday night that he regretted getting Haden involved. On Monday, Sarkisian added: “For the good of the game, I will be better on this in the future.”

Haden apologized for his conduct and said he would stay off the sideline for the next two games. Ninth-ranked USC visits Boston College this Saturday.

Some questioned whether Haden should remain on the selection committee for the College Football Playoff in light of his actions. CFP executive director Bill Hancock said Haden’s status on the committee would not change.

“Emotional outbursts at games are not a matter for the playoff selection committee to deal with,” Hancock said in a statement. “This does not affect Pat Haden’s capability as a committee member. We recognize that athletics directors cannot be dispassionate about their own teams, and that’s why we have the recusal policy.”

The policy is similar to the one used by the NCAA Tournament selection committee, whereby a committee member does not participate in votes involving his or her school.

PULLARD OUT FIRST HALF

The Pac-12 office clarified the situation regarding USC linebacker Hayes Pullard, who was ejected in the second half of the Stanford game for a helmet-to-helmet hit.



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Airport trains back up and running – Atlanta Journal Constitution

More than an hour after the Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport train system went off-line, things went back to normal Friday afternoon.

Trains stopped running around 3 p.m. but were back on-line by around 4:20 p.m., airport spokesman Reese McCranie said.

A computer problem with the train system had brought the trains to a halt and forced people to walk from terminal to terminal.

Atlanta Police Department officers, security teams, airline staff, operations employees and medical teams assisted with the flow of passengers and eased congestion,” according to a news release from the airport.

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